UK Food

International students quite often have a concern about adjusting to the food in the UK. It's quite often the small things that you are used to eating back home that you will likely miss, but trying different foods in another country is all part of understanding a new culture. This can be part of the adventure of living and studying in a new country. Always keep an open mind and don't be afraid to try new things! Many students find that when they return home they end up missing a lot of the new foods they have discovered.

The UK is actually one of the most cosmopolitan countries in the world and you will almost always find any food you want. British people eat a very diverse variety of foods from Asian to African, to Middle Eastern. Most supermarkets will sell foodstuffs from a variety of countries and will likely be able to find exactly what you are looking for. Students mostly cook for themselves so you will soon discover where they buy their foods.

Unlike France, Italy or China, the UK doesn't have a cuisine of it's own, but there are quite a few well know dishes that you should try while you are living in the UK.

  • Fish and Chips

    This has to be one of the most iconic meals in Britain. It is a popular take-away that dates back to the 1800's that consists of fish deep-fried in batter that is accompanied fried chips. They are best eaten fresh and hot straight out of the paper wrapping. They taste even better if you add a little salt and vinegar!.

  • Haggis

    Haggis is by far Scotland's most famous dish. It is a kind of sausage that consists of 'tripe' which is sheep's heart, liver and lungs. This is minced with onions, suet, oatmeal and mixed with stock. Although its description is not immediately appealing, haggis has an excellent nutty texture and delicious savoury flavour!

  • Cornish Pasty

    The Cornish Pasty is a type of pie is legendary throughout Britain, and indeed throughout the world.
    The D shape pastry case makes it instantly recognisable and a must try during your stay in the UK. Cornish Pastys filled with beef, diced potato, swede and onion, and seasoned with salt and pepper.

  • Steak and Kidney Pie

    Steak and kidney is an English dish with a filling of diced beef steak and kidneys in a thick sauce. The kidney is often of ox, lamb, or pork. Pies are very representative of British cuisine and range in size from handheld pies to larger dish sized pies to feed a family.

  • Bangers and Mash

    Nothing could be more British than Bangers and Mash. The word Bangers means sausages, and gets its name from the sound they make when fried in hot oil. Most sausages are made with pork and the meat is seasoned with a variety of spices and herbs. When it comes to accompaniments to make this dish even better, you just can't beat a ladle full of a slow-cooked caramelised onion gravy.

  • Afternoon Tea

    Afternoon tea, that most quintessential of English customs is, perhaps surprisingly, a relatively new tradition. Traditional afternoon tea consists of a selection of dainty sandwiches (including of course thinly sliced cucumber sandwiches), scones served with clotted cream and preserves. Cakes and pastries are also served.

  • Shepherd's Pie

    A traditional Shepherd's Pie in the UK, is made with minced lamb. Unlike pastry type pie, a Shepherd's Pie has a topping of fluffy, creamy mashed potato covering succulent hot mince, vegetables and gravy, it is so warming and simply oozes with flavour!

  • The Sunday Roast

    The Sunday roast lunch is a time honoured tradition in Britain. Roast chicken with bacon rolls, sausages, and bread sauce. Roast lamb with mint sauce. Roast pork with crackling and applesauce. By far though, the most popular Sunday roast has got to be roast beef with Yorkshire pudding.

Britain has many other great goods that you can discover while you're studying there. You'll certainly never run out of things to try with so many internation restaurants availble.